Biography

 

Photo of old camps with 2 horses.

The opening of Lafrenière's farm in 1972 was in goal to put into valor Quebec's yesteryear.

If you look back in the previous years, the human survival was dependant on the quality and the versatility of their mounts, which required a lot of training and healthcare attention for the animal.

One of the training used to ease the human's work was to teach the animal to interpret our body language with little words as: ayé, hue, yah dji associated to them, so that the horse would maneuver without us having to steer.

After acquiring those knowledges from his grandfather during the development of the countryside, Marie Claude Lafrenière being aware of the technological revolution, decided to bring back the traditional methods in hope of conserving the heritage entrusted to him.

In 2001, at the age of 59, Ms. Lafrenière met my young girl, who quickly became her pupil. Having caught on to Ms. Lafrenière passion, we decided to buy the farm in 2007, which is now named Dorelies. Ever since, we continue to use our patrimonial horse, carriage, (Berlots), old harnesses and the methods of work in the forest (skidding...), etc.

We offer to the public from a simple 1 hour ride to an experienced traditional woodcutting activity, all depending on how long you want to enjoy… Our ancester’s survival way via our "bûcheron" (French term for woodcutter) activity. We are proud to say that retired grandparents offer their children and grand children this activity as a gift, knowing that their heritage will have seen how life was back then.

At the heart of our gait to honor our ancestral ways, the legacy horse (le Canadien), the chicken Chanteclerc, and the Canadian cow holds an important and primordial role in the farm. To know everything about those animals, it takes 3-4 hours of animated formation that is available via DORELIES.

« Là où il y a trace d’homme, suit non loin derrière une empreinte de cheval »
  ("Where there was a trace of man, following close behind a horse imprint")

Regards,

Brenda Smith